We've organized a comprehensive list of Indiana nursing schools. Below you'll find information on specific nursing programs such as LPN certificates and ADN, BSN, and MSN degrees. You'll also find a profile of nursing education and careers in each major Indiana city.

Indianapolis, the capital city of Indiana, is home to a good number of schools and universities with nursing programs that offer a variety of options to those interested in a career in nursing. All of these programs, from certifications for nursing assistants (CNA) and licensed practical nurses (LPN) to associate’s (ADN) and bachelor’s degrees in nursing (BSN), are closely monitored, appraised, and approved by the state’s Board of Nursing before they are granted accreditation and allowed to operate.

Fort Wayne, a historic business and educational hub in northeastern Indiana, is home to some of the state’s top colleges and universities with nursing programs, aimed at providing aspiring nurses with a rewarding career path. As the second largest city in Indiana, Fort Wayne is a great place to start a nursing career, with demand for nurses growing steadily and expected to increase by 22% by 2018.

Job prospects for nurses in Evansville, Indiana, are promising at the moment, with the demand for nurses expected to increase by 22% in the next five years, faster than the projected trend across the country. For anyone interested in pursuing a nursing career in the state, the first step is to enroll in a school that offers the training and preparation for the specific role you want.

Job prospects are bright for registered nurses (RNs) in the state of Indiana. The Indiana Department of Workforce Development announced in 2013 that the demand for nurses will remain steady until 2020, with the present number of RNs expected to increase by 27%, higher than the expected growth across the country. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that in the same year, 59,730 nurses were employed in Indiana, earning anywhere from $47,650 to $68,700 annually.

The preference of most employers for registered nurses with a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree has substantially increased over the years, with more and more healthcare institutions and managers looking for well-qualified candidates who can fill key positions in hospitals, outpatient clinics, and nursing homes. This has prompted many educational institutions with nursing programs in Indiana to adapt to the needs of this growing segment of the healthcare industry.

For our 2020 rankings of ADN programs, the research team at Nursing Schools Almanac compiled an extensive database of student performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Aspiring registered nurses in the United States must pass this examination before they may commence practice. Thus, student performance on the NCLEX-RN exam provides an excellent benchmark for comparing the relative quality of associate’s degree programs.

The title of registered nurse is reserved for those who have taken and passed the NCLEX-RN, the licensure exam for qualified bachelor of science in nursing degree (BSN) and associate’s degree in nursing (ADN) holders. All of these nurses are in high demand in Indiana as well as across the United States, but the most sought-after by employers are registered nurses with BSN degrees, since they have completed four years of college education.

For our 2020 rankings of LPN programs, the research team at Nursing Schools Almanac compiled an extensive database of student performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN). Aspiring practical nurses in the United States must pass this examination before they may commence practice. Thus, student performance on the NCLEX-PN exam provides an excellent benchmark for comparing the relative quality of practical nursing programs.