We've organized a comprehensive list of Indiana nursing schools. Below you'll find information on specific nursing programs such as LPN certificates and ADN, BSN, and MSN degrees. You'll also find a profile of nursing education and careers in each major Indiana city.

The preference of most employers for registered nurses with a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree has substantially increased over the years, with more and more healthcare institutions and managers looking for well-qualified candidates who can fill key positions in hospitals, outpatient clinics, and nursing homes. This has prompted many educational institutions with nursing programs in Indiana to adapt to the needs of this growing segment of the healthcare industry.

For our 2020 rankings of ADN programs, the research team at Nursing Schools Almanac compiled an extensive database of student performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Aspiring registered nurses in the United States must pass this examination before they may commence practice. Thus, student performance on the NCLEX-RN exam provides an excellent benchmark for comparing the relative quality of associate’s degree programs.

The title of registered nurse is reserved for those who have taken and passed the NCLEX-RN, the licensure exam for qualified bachelor of science in nursing degree (BSN) and associate’s degree in nursing (ADN) holders. All of these nurses are in high demand in Indiana as well as across the United States, but the most sought-after by employers are registered nurses with BSN degrees, since they have completed four years of college education.

For our 2020 rankings of LPN programs, the research team at Nursing Schools Almanac compiled an extensive database of student performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN). Aspiring practical nurses in the United States must pass this examination before they may commence practice. Thus, student performance on the NCLEX-PN exam provides an excellent benchmark for comparing the relative quality of practical nursing programs.

With demand for medical care increasing, the government is responding by accrediting vocational and technical nursing schools to provide short courses on basic nursing. These services, such as dressing, bathing, and monitoring of medicine intake for patients, are among the responsibilities that certified nursing assistants (CNAs) have assumed from registered nurses. Essentially, CNAs allow registered nurses to tend to job responsibilities that require more advanced education and clinical training.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are over 115,000 nurses actively employed in the state of Indiana. These nurses occupy several distinct roles. The most junior role is that of certified nursing assistant (CNA); Indiana is home to 32,000 CNAs who perform entry-level healthcare tasks like feeding the sick and elderly. The roles of licensed practical nurse (LPN) and registered nurse (RN) require additional education but carry added responsibility and pay. Indiana's 19,000 LPNs earn over $40,000 annually, while the state's almost 60,000 RNs take home $58,000 on average.

Public schooling offers a great education at a decent cost, but private schools usually have the advantage of smaller class size and more personalized attention. Private institutions also enjoy greater freedom in curriculum development since they are not subsidized by the state or local government. As a result, private schools often hold an innovation edge over their public counterparts, especially when it comes to nursing education.

Public schooling often doesn't receive the full credit it deserves. There's a common misperception that public institutions come up short when compared side-by-side with their private counterparts. That’s actually far from the truth. Like any private school, the public school system has an impetus to offer quality education to students. There are many excellent public education options within the nursing field.

It can be difficult to budget the time and money required for career education. The need to earn a living now often feels more pressing than the long-term benefits of a new career path. Thankfully, the field of nursing requires a relatively brief education to get started, and many schools offer flexible programs of study on evenings and weekends.