A comprehensive listing of Virginia nursing schools. Below you'll find information on specific nursing programs such as licensed practical nursing, RN associate's degree, and bachelor's degree. You'll also find a profile of nursing education and careers in each major Virginia city.

Healthcare and social assistance workers make up 12 percent of Virginia’s labor force. The state’s hospitals and health systems contribute $38 billion annually to the local economy. With such a significant and positive impact, it’s not surprising that one of the largest forces within Virginia’s healthcare system is the nurse population.

Charlottesville, Virginia, is home to more than 5,000 nurses. Many of these professionals earned their degree or certificate at a local college or university. Of course, the most prominent local nursing school is the University of Virginia School of Nursing, which offers bachelor of science in nursing (BSN), master of science in nursing (MSN), and doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree programs.

A successful nursing career in the Bluefield metropolitan area begins with a certificate or degree from an accredited nursing school. Fortunately, the metro area of more than 107,000 inhabitants is home to several accredited schools that offer nursing programs at all levels. For example, Bluefield College offers a registered nurse (RN) to bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) pathway, typically called an RN-to-BSN completion program, as well as a master of science in nursing (MSN) program.

The Blacksburg-Christiansburg-Radford area of Virginia is home to more than 2,000 nurses. Many of these nursing professionals earned their degree or certificate at a local college or university. The Radford University School of Nursing offers bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) and doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degrees. New River Community College features associate’s degree in nursing (ADN) and licensed practical nursing (LPN) programs. These are just two of the best nursing schools in the Blacksburg-Christiansburg-Radford metro area.

Arlington, Virginia, is part of the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria metropolitan division. The area has the tenth-highest population of registered nurses (RNs) among U.S. metro areas. Because the nursing community is sizable in Virginia, aspiring nurses will find a number of top schools for nursing that offer a variety of unique degree pathways. For example, Marymount University offers three ways to secure a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree: a traditional four-year BSN, an accelerated BSN, and a hybrid online RN-to-BSN program.

A rewarding nursing career in Alexandria, Virginia, begins with a certificate or degree from an accredited nursing school. Fortunately, the city of more than 150,000 inhabitants is home to a number of accredited schools that offer nursing programs at all levels. For example, Global Health College offers preparation for several different nursing careers, while Saint Michael College of Allied Health has a flagship associate in applied science (AAS) degree.

A master of science in nursing (MSN) degree enables experienced registered nurses (RNs) to enter advanced fields such as clinical nursing leadership, nursing administration, nursing education, or family practice nursing. At least a dozen Virginia universities offer accredited MSN programs. As an example, The University of Virginia offers MSN degrees in specialized nursing fields like adult gerontology, acute care, and psychiatric and mental health.

As the U.S. healthcare industry grows more complex, registered nurses (RNs) need enhanced skills to deliver quality healthcare. RNs with just an associate’s degree in nursing (ADN) or a hospital diploma may be at a disadvantage. This is particularly true in hiring and promotion decisions, since many employers prioritize nurses who hold a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree. Fortunately, working nurses can pursue their baccalaureate education by enrolling in an RN-to-BSN program.

Profile of the RN-to-BSN program

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