A comprehensive listing of Washington, DC nursing schools. Below you'll find information on specific nursing programs such as licensed practical nursing, RN associate's degree, and bachelor's degree.

For our inaugural rankings, the research team at Nursing Schools Almanac collected data on over 3,200 nursing schools and campuses throughout the United States. We included the following states within our Mid-Atlantic rankings: Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. We evaluated each nursing school in the region on three dimensions:

For our inaugural rankings, the research team at Nursing Schools Almanac collected data on over 3,200 nursing schools and campuses throughout the United States. We included the following states within our Mid-Atlantic rankings: Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. We evaluated each nursing school in the region on three dimensions:

For our inaugural rankings, the research team at Nursing Schools Almanac collected data on over 3,200 nursing schools and campuses throughout the United States. We included the following states within our Mid-Atlantic rankings: Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. We evaluated each nursing school in the region on three dimensions:

For our inaugural rankings, the research team at Nursing Schools Almanac collected data on over 3,200 nursing schools and campuses throughout the United States. We included the following states within our Mid-Atlantic rankings: Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. We evaluated each nursing school in the region on three dimensions:

From the Washington Hospital Center to the Department of Veterans Affairs, the healthcare industry in the Washington, DC, area remains in high demand for nurses. These large employers, as well as the American Red Cross and George Washington University Hospital, are always looking for well-educated registered nurses (RNs) for full-time positions, from program evaluators to care coordinators.

To find a job in the healthcare industry today, you must have a solid education. Most major employers are looking for registered nurses (RNs) who have bachelor’s degrees rather than associate’s degrees. Though bachelor’s degrees require a four-year commitment as opposed to two-year associate’s degrees, the extra education makes you more attractive to prospective employers and sets you up for greater earning potential in the future.

The Washington, DC, area maintains a high demand for nurses, particularly registered nurses (RNs). These nurses take on responsibilities that typically require a greater level of technical expertise than the more basic nursing duties of bathing patients or changing bandages. As a result, salaries tend to be higher as well: the median pay for RNs in the DC area is $76,310. Some RNs earn even higher salaries, up to as much as $89,000 or more. Over 11,000 people are employed as nurses in the city, and pursuing the right degree can land you in this lucrative career field.

The healthcare field is currently in need of a larger workforce, and one position in high demand is registered nurse (RN). Registered nurses, like licensed practical nurses (LPNs), provide direct care to patients such as checking vital signs, changing bandages, and administering medicines. Furthermore, RNs are also involved in planning out a patient’s care by examining the patient’s overall needs. As a registered nurse, you may also supervise other nurses, such as LPNs and nursing assistants, to provide direction for patient care.

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